Washington state school board director to teach sexual 'pleasure' class to 9-year-olds at sex shop

A Washington state school board director who owns a sex shop is making headlines after announcing she will teach sex education classes for children as young as nine on topics such as "sexual anatomy for pleasure" and "safer sex practices for all kinds of sexual activities."
"The class for nine- to 12-year-olds is an introduction to topics related to relationships, puberty, bodies, and sexuality.
Mason announced there will be four, three-hour sex education classes held at WinkWink next month as part of an event billed the "Uncringe Academy."
The classes, which Mason will teach, are broken down by age, with nine- to 12-year-olds in one class and 13- to17-year-olds in another class.
Class topics include, "What IS sex?
Kinds of solo and partnered sexual activities," "Sexual anatomy for pleasure and reproduction," "Gender and sexual identities," "Safer sex practices for all kinds of sexual activities," among others.
The description of the classes stipulates that the "workshops are divided by age and presentation of topics will vary for developmental appropriateness (sic)."
WASHINGTON STATE SCHOOL BOARD DIRECTOR SET TO HOST 'QUEER YOUTH OPEN MIC NIGHT' AT SEX SHOPWinkWink is described as a "woman-owned, identity-inclusive sex shop" that is "sex-positive, body-positive, and gender-affirming."
While the "Uncringe Academy" is advertised as offering "honest, supportive, and inclusive sex education classes to help young people of all genders and sexual identities understand this important part of their life."
Mason also described sex as something with no set definition, arguing that one person’s definition of sex can vary from another’s.
"There’s no such thing as ‘real’ sex, and it’s okay if your definition of sex is different from someone else’s."
CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPMason serves as board director for ​​the Bellingham School District, but the upcoming sex education classes will be held in her personal capacity as a local business owner, not as a school official, Rantz reported.